Workshop on Intelligent Music Production

I’ve been invited to talk at this year’s Workshop on Intelligent Music Production, taking place in Huddersfield on September 14th. I’ll be showing some of the applied psychoacoustics work that went into making intuitive and reliable audio-driven interaction strategies for the installation that SONA presented in the last AlgoMech festival.

  • A. V. Beeston, “Unmaking acoustics: Bio-inspired sound information retrieval for an audio-driven artwork,” in 4th Workshop on Intelligent Music Production (WIMP2018), Huddersfield, UK. Invited talk. 14 Sep, 2018.
    [BibTeX] [link]
    @inproceedings{Beeston:2018wimp,
    author = {Beeston, Amy V},
    title = {{Unmaking acoustics: Bio-inspired sound information retrieval for an audio-driven artwork}},
    booktitle = {{4th Workshop on Intelligent Music Production (WIMP2018)}},
    year = {2018},
    address = {Huddersfield, UK. Invited talk. 14 Sep},
    link = {https://research.hud.ac.uk/institutes-centres/apl/events/wimp18/},
    month = sep
    }

Abstract

This talk describes the development and realisation of a sound-driven participatory artwork ‘Unmaking acoustics’ which resulted from a series of initiatives aimed at encouraging women to engage in music technology. Formed during a new researcher-practitioner collaboration, the work is a pragmatic blend of our academic interests and artistic practices, and ‘listens’ to the loudness, pitch and noise content of sounds contributed by visitors in the gallery space. Typically appreciated by ear as a single multivariate aural experience, these sonic aspects are revealed separately to the eye using three colour-coded visual outputs, becoming quasi-independent factors that visitors can use to manipulate aspects of the soundscape produced through loudspeakers. A final display juxtaposes scrolling sonograms of the loudspeaker-generated and microphone-recorded sound, further encouraging sonic exploration and understanding. Using bio-inspired room adaptation mechanisms within our core sound information retrieval methods, we demonstrate that insights from auditory science can help improve the reliability and portability of sound art installations using live audio analysis.